Fine's say Metaphors

Metaphors

Christian Symbolism Melville presents his characters in such a way as to bring out the fundamental conflict between good and evil in the world. He accomplishes this by the use of Christian symbolism. In the presentation of Billy Budd, Melville alludes to both Adam, the innocent first man, and Christ, the...
Up/Down Movements: Whenever Nick stands and climbs, his spirits are likewise rising.  If he sits or descends, on the other hand, he's feeling badly about himself.  Thus, Hemingway made form to follow content. "Good:"Hemingway mimics the biblical creation story to demonstrate the way in which Nick has created his own paradise...
Imagery Although the imagery of light and darkness is prominent in the story, and darkness is an obvious metaphor for evil, the strength of the book lies not so much in L'Engle's use of figurative language as in the strong visual images she creates. This is particularly apparent in the...
Stone Stone facades and structures figure prominently in the story and almost always reflect some characteristics of the persons or action being described. For instance, the Marquis St. Evremonde stone chateau and its various carved images are used to convey the unyielding arrogance of its inhabitant and the manner in...
Light Not only is stage lighting used in the play to express different dramatic moods, light is also used as a metaphor for truth, as opposed to illusion. This can be seen when Blanche asks Mitch to put the paper lantern over the bare light bulb. Covering the light, making...
The Tree: The tree by the Devon River is the first symbol that the reader encounters, the object that draws Gene back to the school fifteen years after he was a student there. Gene's perception of the tree at these two vastly different time periods is a reflection of the...
Music in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Music is a recurring motif in the novel. Either heard directly or remembered or imagined in the mind, music acts for Stephen as an emotional trigger, shifting his moods, conjuring up past memories, revealing something to him that otherwise was...
Wasp Early in the novel (chapter 3), Mrs. Moore returns from the club and sees a small wasp asleep on a coat peg. She does not disturb it. Indeed, she seems to feel quite affectionate toward it, addressing it as "Pretty, dear." The wasp is a symbol of the unity...
To pick out a single metaphor from Swift's Modest Proposal would be to undercut his message as a whole. The whole pamphlet, indeed, in its entirety, is one giant, metaphorical irony. The horror of the narrator's irony serves as a constant metaphor for the horror being experienced by the...
There are four distinct groups of characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream, and they all use language in a distinctive way. Theseus and Hippolyta speak in a dignified blank verse, which is unrhymed verse based on the iambic pentameter line. An iambic pentameter is a line of five feet...
The Rain in A Farewell To Arms The rain is a metaphor for death in the story. Toward the end of Catherine and Frederic's idyll in Milan, she tells him that she has always been afraid of the rain because she can imagine herself or him lying dead in it....
Doll in a doll's house In Act 3, Nora tells Torvald that both her father and Torvald have treated her like a doll-child, with no opinions of her own, and have only played with her. Both men, she says, have committed "a great sin" against her in discouraging her from...
The pervading metaphor in this story, is, predictably, the clean, well-lighted place. To Hemingway, it was much more than the physical darkness that frightened him-it was the symbolic darkness of reality. Hemingway was a modernist, a realist, and a philosopher. He believed the ultimate purpose of life was to...
The most dominant metaphors in A Christmas Carol are the three spirits who visit Scrooge. The Ghost of Christmas Past is a personification of memory. In order for Scrooge to grow as a human being, he must remember his past and learn both positive and negative lessons from it. The...
Proles symbolism in 1984 - The Proles represent the lowest working classes of society (the proletariat) and they also serve as a metaphor for hopelessness. Winston hopes, as did many real thinkers such as Marx, that the Proles could rise up against the Party and restore freedom for all...